Spare the rod teach the child

This week we hear again from psychologists Drs. David and Donna Lane who ask, "What's the meaning behind the proverbial saying, 'Spare the rod and spoil the child,' and does this Bible verse really advocate the beating of children? The closest verse like it is Proverbs

Spare the rod teach the child

Plot[ edit ] John Saunders Bygravesa supply teacher with progressive anti- corporal punishment views, arrives to take up a post at Worrell Street School in a socially deprived area of East London. He is assigned a class of pupils in their last year before leaving school and finds himself in charge of a group of rebellious, badly-behaved teenagers from poor home backgrounds, with no interest in education, who register their defiance of authority by fighting, throwing classroom furniture around, whistling and laughing during bible readings and smoking in class.

The school's headmaster Jenkins Pleasence is well-meaning but has long become despondent with the seemingly insurmountable challenges posed by his pupils and is resigned to merely serving out his time until retirement.

His view that corporal punishment is the only way to maintain even some semblance of order in the classrooms "You'll never be able to handle them unless you're as tough as they are" is anathema to Saunders, who states his intention to try all other methods of discipline rather than resort to physical violence.

Spare the rod teach the child

Saunders's teaching colleagues are all resistant to any change in the school's punishment policy, with their attitudes informed either by disillusion and the fear of otherwise losing control of their pupils completely, or in the case of Arthur Gregory Keen by a seeming relish for corporal punishment which borders on the sadistic.

All share the view that it is useless to try to provide a meaningful education to children who they have already written off as leaving school only to drift into dead-end jobs, and that the best they can hope to do is to maintain some degree of order in the classroom.

Saunders sticks to his principles and starts to make some little headway with his class, although they are baffled by his refusal to rise to provocation and disobedience.

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He spots particular promise in one of the main trouble-makers Fred Harkness O'Sullivanand tries to encourage the boy to explore his potential. The first time Saunders caned any pupils involved Harkness, though it is revealed in a later scene that it was not Harkness's fault, in fact, he was trying to prevent several other pupils from rioting.

When Saunders offers him a handshake and an apology at the end of the scene, Harkness refuses and marches out of the room, all trust between them smashed. Matters come to a head when as a prank the pupils lock Gregory in the school toilets overnight.

The following morning Gregory seeks revenge on those he considers the ringleaders, singling Harkness out for punishment. His assault on the boy escalates beyond reasonable bounds, with him delivering roughly ten strokes of the cane to his left hand, which was twisted behind his back, and Saunders has to step in to restrain him.

Taking advantage of the situation, the other pupils instigate a full-scale classroom riot. Saunders then finds himself being held responsible for undermining the school's strict discipline protocol. He is forced to examine whether he can continue to teach in such an environment, but has the consolation of finally connecting fully with Harkness and convincing him he is talented enough to aspire to something better on leaving school.Spare the Rod is a British social drama directed by Leslie Norman and starring Max Bygraves, Geoffrey Keen, Donald Pleasence and Richard O'Sullivan.

The film was based on a novel by Michael Croft and deals with an idealistic schoolteacher coming to a tough area of East London to teach in a secondary modern school at a time when such establishments were largely starved of attention and.

To "spare the rod" is indicative of a parent who does not discipline their child, that is, to teach, guide, and direct.

Spare the rod teach the child

This is the parent who "hates their child.". Child corporal punishment: Spanking Biblical passages about the spanking of children. Sponsored link.

Spare the Rod - Wikipedia In the US it is still allowed in many states and is used extensively as a means of discipline in other countries around the world. The debate is often impassioned, coloured by our moral, ethical and cultural beliefs.
What does it mean to "spare the rod, spoil the child"? Share via Email 'The more corporal punishment there is over time, the greater the negative effects on children.
What Does Spare the Rod and Spoil the Child Really Mean? What does it mean to "spare the rod, spoil the child"?
What the Bible says about spanking children The rule by which the wise regulate their conduct, is a fountain yielding life and happiness.

Spanking in the Bible: The phrase "spare the rod and spoil the child" is often incorrectly attributed to the Christian Bible. It does not appear there.

Answer: The phrase “spare the rod, spoil the child” is a modern-day proverb that means if a parent refuses to discipline an unruly child, that child will grow accustomed to getting his own way. He will become, in the common vernacular, a spoiled brat.

"Spare the rod and spoil the child" still has strong resonance even in countries where corporal punishment has been abolished, such as the UK and Canada. Answer: The phrase “spare the rod, spoil the child” is a modern-day proverb that means if a parent refuses to discipline an unruly child, that child will grow accustomed to getting his own way.

He will become, in the common vernacular, a spoiled brat.

Spare the Rod, Spoil the Child? | Psychology Today